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Discover the Horrors of the Future In Classics Illustrated's Time Machine
Brian Cronin
2021-07-06T03:06:13
Welcome to 31 Days of Horror Comics, where I will spotlight some of the best horror comics around, as chosen by a bunch of my favorite horror comic writers and artists around!
Today's creator is Nicola Cuti, who was one of the most prolific writers for Warren Publishing's horror comic line. He started there in the early 1970s...
and after some time off, when he was at Charlton Comics (where he created E-Man with Joe Staton), Cuti returned to be one of their top writers in the late 1970s/early 1980s, as well...
Cuti was the recipient of Jim Warren's "Best Overall Writer" award a remarkable 11 years apart! He won one in 1970 and then one in 1981.
When I asked Nick about it, his first suggestion was "Jenifer," which was featured in the first installment of 31 Days of Horror, but since he noted it was already chosen, he explained...
The adaptation of the H.G. Wells' novel came out in 1956 in Classics Illustrated, adapted by Cameron (who later went on to become a prolific writer outside of comics) and Lorenz Graham. It has a gorgeous George Wilson painted cover...
Here, we see the time traveler and his fantastic machine travel deep into the future...
He ends up 800,000 years in the future, where the Earth is seemingly ruled by a weak but peaceful people known as the Eloi...
After his time machine is stolen and locked away, the time traveler realizes that the actual work behind this seemingly perfect society is done by a mysterious race of creatures known as the Morlocks, who live in the darkness...
Nick is correct in noting that Cameron's depiction of the time traveler investigating the Morlocks is played strictly as horror and really well done horror at that...
He plans a way to defeat the Morlocks and regain his time machine and wow, check out how spooky this panel is, as the Morlocks await him...
Of course, the adaptation sort of glosses over the whole unfairness of the whole society in favor of a straightforward "he must defeat the morlocks to return home" narrative, but still, it's really effective storytelling.
As Nick notes, he did a series of illustrations of the Time Machine in the vein of Bernie Wrightson's iconic Frankenstein illustrations. They're gorgeous. Here's one...
And you can find the others here.
Thanks for the suggestion, Nick!
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